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What set Ebert apart

  • Film critic Roger Ebert appealed to Movie aficionados and the popcorn-loving plenty
  • In 1975, Ebert was the first Movie critic to win a Pulitzer Prize
  • His fame ballooned when he hosted a TV show with critic Gene Siskel
  • Ebert’s legacy is explored in “Lifestyles Itself,” debuting Sunday, January Four, at 9 p.m. ET on CNN

Explore more concerning the fascinating world of the late Movie critic Roger Ebert Within The CNN Movie “Lifestyles Itself,” premiering Sunday, January Four, at 9 p.m. ET on CNN.

(CNN) — There was a time when Roger Ebert was, simply, “the fat one.”

When TELEVISION viewers first noticed Ebert — whether or not it was on “Sneak Previews,” his and Gene Siskel’s national PBS Movie overview exhibit, or “Siskel & Ebert & the flicks,” the widely syndicated version — they latched on to the seem: a somewhat rumpled, sweater-vested man with glasses, paired off with the much taller, balding Siskel (who, after all, used to be “the bald one”).

By No Means mind the Pulitzer Prize for criticism, which Ebert was once the first Film critic to win. Never mind the probing interviews with figures comparable to Kirk Douglas and Burt Reynolds. By No Means thoughts the experience he dropped at his job or the no-nonsense attitude he had in offering his evaluations.

The General Public did not see that — except they settled in and watched the 2 Chicago critics go after each other, debating the finer points of “Blue Velvet” or “Die Arduous.” It was once simplest then that, most likely, viewers realized this wasn’t just a show about Movies.

The late "thumbs up" film critic Roger Ebert's career is featured in the CNN Film "Life Itself" -- debuting Sunday, Jan. 4 at 9 p.m. ET. In his reviews, Ebert pulled no punches. Click through the photos to see his high praise ... along with some of Ebert's most devastating lines. The late “thumbs up” Movie critic Roger Ebert’s profession is featured In The CNN Film “Life Itself” — debuting Sunday, Jan. Four at 9 p.m. ET. In his opinions, Ebert pulled no punches. Click On during the photographs to peer his High praise … together with a few of Ebert’s most devastating strains.

For "North," Ebert wrote perhaps his most negative movie review quote ever: "I hated this movie. Hated hated hated hated hated this movie. Hated it. Hated every simpering stupid vacant audience-insulting moment of it. Hated the sensibility that thought anyone would like it. Hated the implied insult to the audience by its belief that anyone would be entertained by it."For “North,” Ebert wrote possibly his most bad Film review quote ever: “I hated this Movie. Hated hated hated hated hated this Film. Hated it. Hated every simpering stupid vacant target market-insulting second of it. Hated the sensibility that idea any individual would adore it. Hated the implied insult to the target market By Using its perception that any person would be entertained Through it.”

"The craft in this film is rare," Ebert wrote of "Argo," a movie about the Iranian hostage crisis. "It is so easy to manufacture a thriller from chases and gunfire, and so very hard to fine-tune it out of exquisite timing and a plot that's so clear to us we wonder why it isn't obvious to the Iranians." It starred Bryan Cranston and Ben Affleck, who also directed it.“The craft on this Movie is uncommon,” Ebert wrote of “Argo,” a Movie in regards to the Iranian hostage problem. “It’s So easy to fabricate a thriller from chases and gunfire, and so very Laborious to positive-tune it out of exquisite timing and a plot that’s so clear to us we wonder why it’s not evident to the Iranians.” It starred Bryan Cranston and Ben Affleck, who additionally directed it.

"In the case of Napoleon Dynamite (Jon Heder), I certainly don't like him, but then the movie makes no attempt to make him likable. Truth is, it doesn't even try to be a comedy," wrote Ebert about the popular 2004 film.“Within The case of Napoleon Dynamite (Jon Heder), I Definitely don’t like him, But then the Film makes no attempt to make him likable. Actuality is, it doesn’t even try to be a comedy,” wrote Ebert in regards to the well-liked 2004 Movie.

"Years from now it is quite possible that 'Bonnie and Clyde' will be seen as the definitive film of the 1960s, showing with sadness, humor and unforgiving detail what one society had come to," wrote Ebert. Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty starred in the title roles.“Years from now it’s rather that you can think of that ‘Bonnie and Clyde’ will probably be viewed as the definitive Film of the Nineteen Sixties, showing with unhappiness, humor and unforgiving element what one society had come to,” wrote Ebert. Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty starred Within The title roles.

"Scrooged" with Bill Murray and David Johansen "... was obviously intended as a comedy, but there is little comic about it, and indeed the movie's overriding emotions seem to be pain and anger," Ebert wrote. "You can't bad-mouth 'A Christmas Carol' all the way through and then expect us to believe the good cheer at the end."“Scrooged” with Bill Murray and David Johansen “… used to be obviously supposed as a comedy, But there is little comic about it, and indeed the Film’s overriding emotions appear to be ache and anger,” Ebert wrote. “That You May’t dangerous-mouth ‘A Christmas Carol’ all the way through and then expect us to consider the good cheer on the finish.”

Tom Hanks starred as Valleysman Zachry and Halle Berry starred as Meronym in "Cloud Atlas." Many viewers, including Ebert, found this film to be confusing. But that didn't prevent Ebert from praising it. " ... oh, what a film this is! And what a demonstration of the magical, dreamlike qualities of the cinema. And what an opportunity for the actors. And what a leap by the directors, who free themselves from the chains of narrative continuity."Tom Hanks starred as Valleysman Zachry and Halle Berry starred as Meronym in “Cloud Atlas.” Many viewers, together with Ebert, discovered this Movie to be confusing. However that did not stop Ebert from praising it. ” … oh, what A Film that is! And what a demonstration of the magical, dreamlike traits of the cinema. And what an opportunity for the actors. And what a bounce By Using the directors, who free themselves from the chains of narrative continuity.”

"The movie is an assault on the eyes, the ears, the brain, common sense and the human desire to be entertained," Ebert wrote about the 1998 action/adventure film, "Armageddon." "No matter what they're charging to get in, it's worth more to get out."“The Movie is an assault on the eyes, the ears, the mind, common experience and the human need to be entertained,” Ebert wrote about the 1998 action/adventure Film, “Armageddon.” “No Matter What they’re charging to get in, It Can Be value extra to get out.”

"And so begins one of the truest, most luminous love stories ever made, Ingmar Bergman's 'Scenes From a Marriage.' The marriage of Johan and Marianne will disintegrate soon after the film begins, but their love will not," wrote Ebert. Erland Josephson and Liv Ullmann played the couple.“And so begins one of the truest, most luminous love tales ever made, Ingmar Bergman’s ‘Scenes From a marriage.’ The Marriage of Johan and Marianne will disintegrate soon after the Movie starts, However their love will not,” wrote Ebert. Erland Josephson and Liv Ullmann performed the couple.

Writing about "Goodfellas," Ebert said, "No finer film has ever been made about organized crime -- not even 'The Godfather,' although the two works are not really comparable." Ray Liotta, here with Gina Mastrogiacomo, starred. Writing about “Goodfellas,” Ebert stated, “No finer Film has ever been made about prepared crime — No Longer even ‘The Godfather,’ even if the two works are not actually comparable.” Ray Liotta, here with Gina Mastrogiacomo, starred.

For "Being John Malkovitch," Ebert suggested that the "movie has ideas enough for half a dozen films, but (Director Spike) Jonze and his cast handle them so surely that we never feel hard-pressed; we're enchanted by one development after the next." Catherine Keener and John Cusack starred.For “Being John Malkovitch,” Ebert advised that the “Movie has ideas enough for half of a dozen films, But (Director Spike) Jonze and his solid deal with them so surely that we By No Means really feel Hard-pressed; we’re enchanted By one development after the subsequent.” Catherine Keener and John Cusack starred.

"'Mad Dog Time' is the first movie I have seen that does not improve on the sight of a blank screen viewed for the same length of time," Ebert wrote. "Oh, I've seen bad movies before. But they usually made me care about how bad they were."“‘Mad Canine Time’ is the primary Film I Have viewed that doesn’t toughen on the sight of a blank Reveal viewed for the same length of time,” Ebert wrote. “Oh, I’ve considered unhealthy Films Prior To. However they regularly made me care about how bad they were.”

"Minority Report" Director Steven Spielberg is "a master filmmaker at the top of his form, working with a star, Tom Cruise, who generates complex human feelings even while playing an action hero," Ebert wrote. "... This film is such a virtuoso high-wire act, daring so much, achieving it with such grace and skill. 'Minority Report' reminds us why we go to the movies in the first place."“Minority Document” Director Steven Spielberg is “a grasp filmmaker at the prime of his form, working with a celeb, Tom Cruise, who generates complicated human feelings even whereas enjoying an motion hero,” Ebert wrote. “… This Movie is this kind of virtuoso Excessive-wire act, daring a lot, achieving it with such grace and ability. ‘Minority File’ reminds us why we go to the flicks In The first position.”

"'Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo' makes a living prostituting himself. How much he charges I'm not sure, but the price is worth it if it keeps him off the streets and out of another movie." Rob Schneider played the title role.“‘Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo’ makes a living prostituting himself. How much he fees I’m Not sure, But the associated fee is worth it if it keeps him off the streets and out of Some Other Film.” Rob Schneider played the title position.

Kevin Costner, center, played district attorney Jim Garrison with Michael Rooker, and Jay O. Sanders in "JFK," directed by Oliver Stone. "I have no opinion on the factual accuracy of his 1991 film 'JFK.' I don't think that's the point. This is not a film about the facts of the assassination, but about the feelings. ... 'JFK' is a masterpiece." ... it "is a brilliant reflection of our unease and paranoia, our restless dissatisfaction."Kevin Costner, heart, played district attorney Jim Garrison with Michael Rooker, and Jay O. Sanders in “JFK,” directed By Way Of Oliver Stone. “I haven’t any opinion on the factual accuracy of his 1991 Film ‘JFK.’ I Don’t assume that’s the purpose. This Is Not A Movie concerning the facts of the assassination, But about the feelings. … ‘JFK’ is a masterpiece.” … it “is a great reflection of our unease and paranoia, our restless dissatisfaction.”

After seeing "A Lot Like Love," Ebert wrote: "Judging by their dialogue, Oliver and Emily have never read a book or a newspaper, seen a movie, watched TV, had an idea, carried on an interesting conversation or ever thought much about anything. The movie thinks they are cute and funny, which is embarrassing, like your uncle who won't stop with the golf jokes." Ashton Kutcher and Amanda Peet were Oliver and Emily.After seeing “a lot Like Love,” Ebert wrote: “Judging By their dialogue, Oliver and Emily have Never read a ebook or a newspaper, seen a Film, watched TELEVISION, had an idea, carried on a fascinating conversation or ever thought much about anything. The Film thinks they are cute and funny, which is embarrassing, like your uncle who is not going to cease with the golf jokes.” Ashton Kutcher and Amanda Peet have been Oliver and Emily.

"Certainly 'Birth of a Nation' is a film of great visual beauty and narrative power," Ebert wrote in 2003. However, he wrote that the film is "unapologetic about its attitudes, which are those of a white Southerner, raised in the 19th century, unable to see African-Americans as fellow beings of worth and rights." ... is it "possible to separate the content from the craft? ... If we are to see this film, we must see it all, and deal with it all."“Undoubtedly ‘Beginning of a Nation’ is A Movie of great visual magnificence and narrative power,” Ebert wrote in 2003. On The Other Hand, he wrote that the Movie is “unapologetic about its attitudes, which might be those of a white Southerner, raised Within The 19th century, unable to look African-Americans as fellow beings of price and rights.” … is it “that you can think of to separate the content from the craft? … If we are to see this Film, we must see all of it, and take care of all of it.”

"The Usual Suspects" -- with Kevin Pollak, Stephen Baldwin, Benicio del Toro, Gabriel Byrne and Kevin Spacey -- won an Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay, by Christopher McQuarrie. Nonetheless, Ebert didn't like it. "I prefer to be amazed by motivation, not manipulation."“the standard Suspects” — with Kevin Pollak, Stephen 1st Earl Baldwin Of Bewdley, Benicio del Toro, Gabriel Byrne and Kevin Spacey — gained an Academy Award for Absolute Best Unique Screenplay, Through Christopher McQuarrie. However, Ebert failed to like it. “I favor to be amazed By Using motivation, Not manipulation.”

How could Hollywood go wrong with a movie starring comedy kingpins Martin Short, Steve Martin and Chevy Chase? Ebert's answer: "Three Amigos." "This movie is too confident, too relaxed, too clever to be really funny."How might Hollywood go wrong with a Film starring comedy kingpins Martin Brief, Steve Martin and Chevy Chase? Ebert’s resolution: “Three Amigos.” “This Film is just too confident, too relaxed, too suave to be in point of fact funny.”

The pairing of Ben Affleck and Sandra Bullock in "Forces of Nature" failed to impress Ebert. "The movie is a dead zone of boring conversations, contrived emergencies, unbelievable characters and lame storytelling."The pairing of Ben Affleck and Sandra Bullock in “Forces of Nature” did not galvanize Ebert. “The Movie is a lifeless zone of boring conversations, contrived emergencies, incredible characters and lame storytelling.”

The Academy Award-nominated "Agnes of God," starring Jane Fonda and Meg Tilly received a one-star review from Ebert: "It considers, or pretends to consider, some of the most basic questions of human morality and treats them on the level of 'Nancy Drew and the Secret of the Old Convent.'"The Academy Award-nominated “Agnes of God,” starring Jane Fonda and Meg Tilly bought a one-famous person evaluation from Ebert: “It considers, or pretends to consider, one of the most most basic questions of human morality and treats them on the extent of ‘Nancy Drew and the key of the Previous Convent.'”

Ebert called the popular teen sex comedy "Fast Times at Ridgemont High" a "scuz-pit of a movie." "... the makers of 'Fast Times at Ridgemont High' have an absolute gift for taking potentially funny situations and turning them into general embarrassment."Ebert referred to as the well-liked teen sex comedy “Fast Instances at Ridgemont Excessive” a “scuz-pit of a Film.” “… the makers of ‘Quick Instances at Ridgemont High’ have an absolute reward for taking probably funny situations and turning them into common embarrassment.”

The romantic comedy "Splash" co-starred Daryl Hannah as a mermaid. "It's too bad the relentlessly conventional minds that made this movie couldn't have made the leap from sitcom to comedy."The romantic comedy “Splash” co-starred Daryl Hannah as a mermaid. “It Can Be too dangerous the relentlessly standard minds that made this Film could not have made the soar from sitcom to comedy.”

Before his death in 2013, Ebert wore a prosthesis after losing much of his jaw to thyroid cancer. During his career Ebert wrote thousands of movie reviews and, with Gene Siskel, co-hosted the iconic TV show "Siskel and Ebert At The Movies." Siskel died in 1999 after battling a brain tumor. Explore the fascinating world of Roger Ebert in the CNN Film "Life Itself" -- debuting Sunday, Jan. 4 at 9 p.m. ET.Ahead Of his demise in 2013, Ebert wore a prosthesis after dropping so much of his jaw to thyroid cancer. Throughout his profession Ebert wrote hundreds of Movie opinions and, with Gene Siskel, co-hosted the enduring TELEVISION show “Siskel and Ebert at the Movies.” Siskel died in 1999 after scuffling with a mind tumor. Explore the attention-grabbing world of Roger Ebert In The CNN Movie “Existence Itself” — debuting Sunday, Jan. 4 at 9 p.m. ET.

OUCH: Roger Ebert pulled no punches
Fail: ‘Napoleon Dynamite’ (2004)
Gem: ‘Bonnie and Clyde’ (1967)
Gem: ‘Cloud Atlas’ (2012)
Fail: ‘Armageddon’ (1998)
Gem: ‘Scenes From a marriage’ (1974)
Gem: ‘Being John Malkovich’ (1999)
Fail: ‘Mad Dog Time’ (1996)
Gem: ‘Minority Document’ (2004)
Fail: ‘Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo’ (2005)
Fail: ‘rather a lot Like Love’ (2005)
Gem: ‘Delivery of a Nation’ (1915)
Fail: ‘the same old Suspects’ (1995)
Fail ‘Three Amigos’ (1986)
Fail: ‘Forces of Nature’ (1999)
Fail: ‘Agnes of God’ (1985)
Fail: ‘Quick Instances at Ridgemont Excessive’ (1982)

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Ebert's movie gems ... and failsEbert’s Film gem stones … and fails

‘They’d chemistry You Could’t purchase’

Roger Ebert, trailblazer

Richard Roeper: Glad Ebert is at peace

Ebert was once mayor of ‘Film Criticville’

It was once also a show about Movie reviewing, Film embracing, movieGOING. A shared awe and love of images projected at nighttime.

And that was once Ebert’s genius. (Siskel, who died in 1999, must get some credit, too. The pair’s chemistry was once essential to the exhibit’s spirit.)

They reveled in Movie in ways that appealed to the aficionados — people who knew who Andrew Sarris and Pauline Kael had been — and to the plenty, popcorn-loving audiences who failed to care a lot about art as looking to be entertained for 2 hours.

But neatly Sooner Than “Sneak Previews” and smartly after Siskel’s loss of life, Ebert reveled in Movie and shared his enthusiasm with others. In 1967, when he used to be employed as the Chicago Sun-Occasions’ Movie critic, he hadn’t yet became 25 However seemed like A Movie veteran.

A generation later, when the Web got here calling, he was once in every single place it, growing his own web page, tweeting often, sounding off in a single format or Every Other. He made his web site a home for young Movie fanatics and ran reviews from “a ways-flung correspondents.”

He invited feedback and, possibly noticeably, hardly needed to care for trolls. Through loving dialog, he made sure the talk was at all times respectful. Trolls and fanboys went somewhere else to vent.

It Can Be Not that he wasn’t opinionated. His arguments with Siskel — and later with Richard Roeper — testify to that. Considered One Of his books was once titled “I Hated, Hated, Hated This Film.” Every Other used to be “Your Movie Sucks.”

But even the emotion was once less about anger than disappointment, a sense of “how dare you.” He knew how Laborious it was once to make a Film; in the end, he’d written the script for a couple, including “Past the Valley of the Dolls,” and went out of his approach to praise small performances and little-recognized filmmakers. A Movie that didn’t try was once Greater Than a waste of time. It was an offense.

“(I) hated the implied insult to the target market By its belief that someone would be entertained With The Aid Of it,” he wrote about “North.”

“I’ve considered unhealthy Films Before. But they regularly made me care about how dangerous they have been,” he wrote a few Film called “Mad Dog Time.”

Not even cancer, which pressured the removal of his lower jaw and ultimately took his Existence, could tamp down his power.

As he watches a Film, “Ebert scribbles repeatedly, his pen digging into page after page, and then he tears the pages out of his pc and drops them to the floor round him. Maybe 20 or 30 Occasions, the sound of paper being torn from a spiral rises from the aisle seat In The remaining row,” Chris Jones wrote in a 2010 Esquire profile. “The lights come back on. Ebert stays in his chair, savoring, surrounded Through his notes. It seems as if he is sitting on top of a cloud of paper.”

Gazing Films has been in comparison with waking dreams: the darkness, the colors, the feel of being immersed in Any Other world. More Than as soon as, Ebert wrote concerning the experience of seeing movies as a reverie and get away. Few had been higher at conveying that experience to those outdoor the theater.

And that cloud? You Will see him there, a person among the mist, misplaced In The gentleCALLOUT –>


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